ryanlangdraws:

I’ve had people insist that I used 3d an photos, despite my assertion that I haven’t. You can see the thread here http://www.reddit.com/r/comicbooks/comments/2ag3ku/this_is_a_painting_iron_man_by_ryan_lang/ But this isn’t for them. This is for people that like to see the process of an illustration. I tried to break it down, but if there are any questions, please ask. I have no problem with artists using photos or 3d in their digital work, so when I say I didn’t use photos or 3d for this image, it was that I wanted to see what I could accomplish on my own (with a couple of filters at the end). And if after this process post people still refuse to believe that I didn’t use photos or 3d….. I will take that as a compliment.

(via capsaicinoid)

Jul 24, 2014 4493 Buckets
psdo:

vaporware-femme:

jennythepirate:

desdinova:

jennythepirate:

I haven’t posted progress in a million years. The chain suit is finished. All I have left is finishing the leather and casting the elf ears.

You did Merrill’s full-body chain?! It looks amazing, how did you do it? It must have taken SO much time and work! Err, I should ask, is it ok to reblog this? I just wanted my followers to see it.

Thanks:D Rebloging is fine. Your followers can also see my bathroom:D
It’s taken about 2 years. There are 20,000 aluminum rings (I think it was 16 gauge but I don’t remember.) The instructions for making the sleeves and making it fitted come from here http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm I also used the pants pattern from the Armor Archive. http://www.armourarchive.org/essays/book__practical_chainmail/practical_chainmail.shtml

I am reblogging this version too so my followers can see it and spread it like wild fire, this took two years of sticking to it and pure dedication
I have literally never seen something more badass, I’m like in cosplay tears over it and I remember you starting this forever ago and I remember liking it back then too. It is amazing to see and I hope I get to see pictures of the final product.
Seriously well done. Oh my frick.

wHAT Hi Res

psdo:

vaporware-femme:

jennythepirate:

desdinova:

jennythepirate:

I haven’t posted progress in a million years. The chain suit is finished. All I have left is finishing the leather and casting the elf ears.

You did Merrill’s full-body chain?! It looks amazing, how did you do it? It must have taken SO much time and work! Err, I should ask, is it ok to reblog this? I just wanted my followers to see it.

Thanks:D Rebloging is fine. Your followers can also see my bathroom:D

It’s taken about 2 years. There are 20,000 aluminum rings (I think it was 16 gauge but I don’t remember.) The instructions for making the sleeves and making it fitted come from here http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm I also used the pants pattern from the Armor Archive. http://www.armourarchive.org/essays/book__practical_chainmail/practical_chainmail.shtml

I am reblogging this version too so my followers can see it and spread it like wild fire, this took two years of sticking to it and pure dedication

I have literally never seen something more badass, I’m like in cosplay tears over it and I remember you starting this forever ago and I remember liking it back then too. It is amazing to see and I hope I get to see pictures of the final product.

Seriously well done. Oh my frick.

wHAT

Jul 22, 2014 5605 Buckets

loish:

process video for the sketch from my last blog post! info on brushes, layers etc can be found in the description for the video on vimeo.

(via artanecdotally)

Source: loish
Jul 21, 2014 3479 Buckets

webcomicdojo:

thesilvereye:

View the fullsize tutorial on DA | The most handy hair structure tutorials are this video by Proko and thisblog post.These are useful for thinking about the direction hair locks flow with different styles: 1 2 3 4 5 | Painting Realistic Hair | Shading with gradients: 1 2 | Tutorials by me including: Gimp Brush Dynamics, Coloring Eyes and Coloring Method.

All example characters are fromThe Silver Eye webcomic!

So need this

Source: thesilvereye
Jul 20, 2014 21634 Buckets
myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.
Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.
What you’ll need:
circular knitting needles
yarn
small scales
You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.
Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!
(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)
Read More
Hi Res

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.

Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.

What you’ll need:

  • circular knitting needles
  • yarn
  • small scales

You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.

Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!

(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)

Read More

Jul 17, 2014 3614 Buckets
thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photoSill Level: Beginner
Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.
The Basics
You camera has a sensor.

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 
Aperture
The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.
Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.
A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 
A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 
Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.
Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.
Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 
Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.
There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 
ISO
ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.
Getting the Balance
A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.
To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 
To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 
If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 
Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 
TL;DR
Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
Not enough light = underexposed
Too much light = overexposed
Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
A large hole is a small f-stop
A small hole is a large f-stop
A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
ISO is the amplification of the sensor
HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result
Photos by Froggie
You can find me here: [tumblr | wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.
If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along! Hi Res

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photo
Sill Level: Beginner

Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.

The Basics

You camera has a sensor.

image

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

image

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 

Aperture

The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

image

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.

Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

image

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.

A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 

A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

image

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.

Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.

Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 

Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

image

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

image

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.

There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 

ISO

ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

image

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.

Getting the Balance

A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.

To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 

To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 

If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 

Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 

TL;DR

  • Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
  • Not enough light = underexposed
  • Too much light = overexposed
  • Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
  • A large hole is a small f-stop
  • A small hole is a large f-stop
  • A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
  • A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
  • A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
  • A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
  • ISO is the amplification of the sensor
  • HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
  • LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result

Photos by Froggie

You can find me here: [tumblr wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.

If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

(via tmilosav)

Jul 17, 2014 6251 Buckets
Dragons

thewritingcafe:

pitviperofdoom asked you:

Dragons. Do you have any useful links on dragons? Different types from different mythologies, different designs and features and abilities, that sort of thing?

General:

(via doublefudgeb-icecream)

Jul 15, 2014 3581 Buckets
HOW NOT TO DRAW ARCHERY: AN ART TUTORIAL.

badarcherart:

katieispainting:

DISCLAIMER: I was going to make this “how to draw archery”, but that would probably have taken the rest of my life. This is all stuff I’ve learned from practicing archery in the past, and the tips I’ve given should translate to many, if not all styles…

Jul 7, 2014 5892 Buckets

strideersantlers said: Toasty, I just want to say not only is your art great, but you're a great person and I someday hope I can draw like you with enough practice because, frankly, I love both your attention to detail and your art style. <3 Do you have any tips for drawings face shapes and features? It's not exactly my strength.

toastyhat:

I kind of got lost talking about expressions but I would also like to stress that variation is super important—going outside your comfort zone with different kinds of features and face shapes!  My role model in that area is mangaka Yusuke Murata. uvu

image

image

image

Source: toastyhat
Jul 3, 2014 1789 Buckets
thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.
When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:
Is it a spoken language?
Is it a written language?
Is it a sign language?
Is it a combination of the above?
Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:
What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?
Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:
Spoken Language:
Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:

Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:

Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.


Other:
Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?
Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language in One Day
Language Construction Kit
Using Invented Languages in Your Novel
Hi Res

thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.

When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:

  1. Is it a spoken language?
  2. Is it a written language?
  3. Is it a sign language?
  4. Is it a combination of the above?

Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:

  1. What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
  2. How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
  3. Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
  4. Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?

Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:

Spoken Language:

  • Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
  • Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
  • Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
  • Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
  • Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
  • Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
  • Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:
  • Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
  • Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
  • Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
  • Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
  • Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:
  • Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
  • Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.

Other:

  • Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
  • Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
  • History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?

Create Your Own Language

How to Create a Language in One Day

Language Construction Kit

Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

(via sangpai)

Jun 29, 2014 8830 Buckets

slckat said: What service do you use to print your books? Are there hardcover options? Thanks! You're amazing!

reapersun:

I hope you don’t mind that I publish this, since others might like to see as well.

These are some of the places I’ve used to print books so far. I’m not really particularly recommending any specific place, I think anyone looking to print a book should look into many places and choose what works for them. You can write and ask them if they’ll do a certain thing, since most of them don’t list their complete services (such as hardcover). These blurbs are based on my own experiences and might vary for you.

RA Comics Direct

Pros: super fast, super responsive, low runs, pretty reasonable pricing, does a lot of file set up for you at no charge

Cons: doesn’t print explicit/nsfw content, print quality is good for black and white or sketch collections but not artbooks, pretty limited print selection

Books printed with them: Wreck, all SFW doodlebooks, ABCs with Ben, Red Pants doodlebook

MCRL Printing

Pros: HELLA quality (uses offset printing process vs digital) good for artbooks, good pricing (last time I used them), reasonably manufacture time, a lot of print options if you know what to ask for

Cons: very slow communications, slow shipping, printed in China (bad for local business), requires files be set up at pdf in Indesign or similar program, doesn’t print nsfw content, requires very high runs

Books printed with them: 7 Patch Problem

SIPS Comics

Pros: prints nsfw content, low runs

Cons: pricing is high, charges more for nsfw content vs normal content, slow communication and slow manufacturing, print quality is grainy even for digital

Books printed with them: NSFW Doodlebook

DoujinPress

Pros: prints nsfw content, really good communication, they handle a lot of setup, pretty good quality, does low runs, fast manufacturing options

Cons: pricing is pretty high, some quality issues (i used a matte cover with black and so every book was very obviously scuffed in the print process)

Books printed with them: All the Days (30 day challenge collection)

Transcontinental (note, I’m only part of the way through the process with them and so this isn’t a full evaluation)

Pros: prints nsfw content, judging from other books I’ve bought from them they have really good quality, very good pricing, reasonable low runs (about 100)

Cons: fairly slow communications, difficult for someone inexperienced to understand a lot of their communications/directions, some kind of totally wack shipping cost that I’ve still negotiating with them, a lot of forms you have to fill out

Books printed with them: Banquet (Hannibal)

Here are also some other places that have been recommended to me but I haven’t used:

Print Ninja (does hardcover, foil, cheap but high run)

DocuCopies (cheap)

Hope that helps :))

Source: reapersun
Jun 21, 2014 885 Buckets

shnoppsies:

louiseliang:

How to Tie a Lolita Bow

all things useful

(via sangpai)

Source: louiseliang
Jun 21, 2014 68924 Buckets

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

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BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

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AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

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AND STILL MORE

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SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

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PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

(via sangpai)

Source: starscrmeme
Jun 17, 2014 104769 Buckets

jothezette:

Some more advice that I have no right to give.  I’m serious about the Stephen Silver advice though- he’s the man.

(via artanecdotally)

Source: jothezette
Jun 16, 2014 20227 Buckets