nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese
A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.
The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.
Resources:
[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site][Kana Invaders Game][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.
Resources:
[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.[Most Common Words List][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.
Resources:
[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through Mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people ho make TextFugu (below) can help you learn Kanji from scratch.[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.
If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.
Resources:
[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

The Fun Parts: Using Japanese Online Media
So you probably have learnt Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your learning advantage!
Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in. Try translating Japanese songs, etc.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!
For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

Any more tips? Comment below!
Hi Res

nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese

A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.

The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.

Resources:

[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)
[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site]
[Kana Invaders Game]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.

Resources:

[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.
[Most Common Words List]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.

Resources:

[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through Mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people ho make TextFugu (below) can help you learn Kanji from scratch.
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.

If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.

Resources:

[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.
[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

The Fun Parts: Using Japanese Online Media

So you probably have learnt Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your learning advantage!

Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in. Try translating Japanese songs, etc.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!

For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

http://nadinenihongo.tumblr.com/post/47984748297/ultimate-japanese-resources-list

Any more tips? Comment below!

(via julystorms)

Sep 18, 2014 89156 Buckets
clevergirlhelps:

Includes:
200 male, 200 female, and 200 unisex names
Common and unusual names
Definitions and nationalities
Pronunciations for Irish/Scottish Gaelic names
English, Arabic, Japanese, Italian, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Greek, German, Latin, French, American, Spanish, Scandinavian, Hebrew, Turkish, Russian, Hindi, Turkish, Bulgarian, and Iranian/Persian names
** denotes a name heavily associated with a preexisting entity, fictional or real
Read More
Hi Res

clevergirlhelps:

Includes:

  • 200 male, 200 female, and 200 unisex names
  • Common and unusual names
  • Definitions and nationalities
  • Pronunciations for Irish/Scottish Gaelic names
  • English, Arabic, Japanese, Italian, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Greek, German, Latin, French, American, Spanish, Scandinavian, Hebrew, Turkish, Russian, Hindi, Turkish, Bulgarian, and Iranian/Persian names

** denotes a name heavily associated with a preexisting entity, fictional or real

Read More

(via digitalarcadia)

Sep 17, 2014 3420 Buckets
4sk-l4tul4-pyrop3:

micaxiii:

deductionfreak:

hazelguay:

The most valuable chart…



yes thanks for colouring it I had a hard time reading that

// I’m going to reblog this to help all RPers when it comes to descriptions
// Even if you’re a great RPer you still need this.
// To describe
// y’know
// the things
Hi Res

4sk-l4tul4-pyrop3:

micaxiii:

deductionfreak:

hazelguay:

The most valuable chart…

image

yes thanks for colouring it I had a hard time reading that

// I’m going to reblog this to help all RPers when it comes to descriptions

// Even if you’re a great RPer you still need this.

// To describe

// y’know

// the things

(via sangiecoon)

Source: hazeeelguay
Sep 16, 2014 178018 Buckets

How It’s Said (substitutes)
In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.
In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.
In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.
In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.
In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.
In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.
In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.
In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.
In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.
In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.
In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.
As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.
[Source] [[Jack Teagle]
Hi Res

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

(via sangiecoon)

Sep 13, 2014 31126 Buckets

myhatseatpeople:

doodlemancy-library:

crocolate:

whitepool:

criminy:

Steve Hampton: Figure Drawing: Design and Invention

Figure Drawing 

I took one of his classes back when I went to art school and he’s an incredible professor and instructor. I’d advise people to look through his studies and even buy his book. It’s not necessarily how to draw correct anatomy but to know it while making it stylized. His class basically teaches the mechanics of the body while using imagination. 

Seriously, I recommend anyone to attending one of his online workshops. It’s kind of pricey but much more affordable than what I paid. Then again I had my own benefits.  

 

WHOA

-shoves these refs under my arm-

Have I reblogged these before?? I DON’T EVEN CARE

THANK YOU

(via sodalimepop)

Sep 10, 2014 22356 Buckets

gomasio666:

It may be useful when drawing a picture. 

(via sangiecoon)

Source: gomasio666
Sep 9, 2014 10642 Buckets

Anonymous said: Do you know what would be an appropriate sort of sword for a smallish teenage girl? She hasn't used a sword before (she will be taught) and she doesn't have any sword specific strength built up, but she's grown up doing farm work and can shoot a fairly heavy bow. For that matter, do you know anything about bow weights? (sorry if these are stupid questions)

howtofightwrite:

Well, here’s the thing about swords (and all weapons, really), wielding them isn’t about strength. It’s a fallacy perpetrated by games like D&D, where the combat stats are governed by strength and some historians confusing the gilded twenty pound parade swords for actual combat weapons. But don’t take just my word for it, here’s the awesome Scholagladitoria talking about misconceptions and stereotypes regarding both bow and the sword in fiction. (Also the difference between a war bow and the hunting bow, plus some talk about draw weight.)

The average longsword will weigh between four and six pounds. So, saying your character has to worry about sword weight is like you saying you can’t pick up a chair or your laptop. A backpack laden with binders and books can run up to around around 15 to 20 pounds, what you carry/carried to school every day on your back is heavier than a sword. It really doesn’t take much strength to lift them. (Yes, even a Claymore.)

Now, what gets most people in trouble when they have no experience and try to lift a blade is balance issues. Swords are awkward. A major part of the training is molding the body to compensate for the different balance. This is learning the positions, grips, footwork, stances, and striking patterns; developing muscular endurance and flexibility in the core, the upper, and lower body, along with strengthening the hands, wrists, and ankles.

Remember, the point of training is developing the muscles and building endurance. As you can see in this lovely chart, the way those muscles are developed through different kinds of activity will change the physical appearance of the body. As scholagladitoria says in his video above, your farm girl is used to wielding a hunting bow, not a war bow so it’s unlikely she’ll have large, strong muscles in the back and shoulders necessary to handle the 50 to 60 pounds of draw weight and wield it effectively (never mind aiming). You do need heavier arrows with larger metal tips to take on armored opponents and a stronger bow than a hunting bow to get the speed/momentum necessary to puncture and penetrate the armor.

Fighting with a sword isn’t about swinging it as hard as you can. Using a any sword requires precision and control, the ability to generate, balance, and control your momentum. The longsword in particular because is usually used with two hands is a good example of this. The second hand handles the rotation of the blade, creating more power, while the other hand guides it. What she’s going to need to build (and what her training master will require from her) is endurance. Beyond just learning how to wield the sword, she’ll also learn how to stand, how to breathe, exercises to develop balance, mental exercises to develop hand and eye coordination, and others in a similar vein. If she has the option, she’ll train on multiple different kinds of terrain. Not just fighting, but running, exercising, and practicing her footwork. Fighting on sand, in water, on mud are useful for teaching her all the different ways she’ll have to adjust herself and how different surfaces can tire you faster.

So, which sword should she use?

The one which is most common and makes the most sense for her social class, aka the one she has easiest access to. If you’re basing your setting somewhere similar to Medieval Europe or using characters who are European influenced, I suggest sticking with European weapons. You can’t really drop a katana into the Middle Ages and expect it to make sense (or be automatically awesome).

The arming sword, the sword and buckler were common self-defense weapons of the peasantry or the Non-Nobility but, really, pick a period in history and research both it and the weapon before making your decision. Not all swords make sense in all periods (though the longsword was a staple in Europe for hundreds of years). The kind of opponents your character is facing will do more to decide what she carries than personal preference. It’s important to assess what your options are, so you can choose what you like and what fits her best while also staying true and respecting the weapon’s history (both cultural and martial).

Links! (A jumping off point for your research needs.)

Scholagladitoria on bullshit perceptions of “manliness” and “unmanliness” of the longsword and the rapier (aka why you shouldn’t just go with the rapier/smallsword, because general perceptions says it’s “more feminine/girly”/lighter/easier), this video, where he discusses the evolution of the sword and different kinds of swords in European history, this video where he talks about the historical position of arming sword/sword and buckler versus the longsword. Actually, just go through his YouTube portfolio if you’re doing anything regarding European/Medieval weaponry and want to better understand it’s historical applications connotations and how some of it has been reflected in media. His breakdowns of different movie fight scenes is interesting and worth looking at for comparing the difference between Hollywood presentation and Historical accuracy.

ARMA instructor John Clements demos engages and disarms, here is the ARMA website with tons of videos talking about the historical ways of wielding Medieval and Renaissance weapons. It’s mostly the long sword, but there’s a lot of good stuff there.

This training montage with Anthony Hopkins and Antonio Banderes from the Mask of Zorro might help when figuring out training sequences. However, be warned, the movie switches between the foil and the sabre at random. (The sabre is generally regarded as the most visually entertaining of the three European fencing blades (foil, epee, sabre) because of the larger movements and circular patterns.)

Wikitenaur is a great place to go to look at different historical fighting manuals. However, I don’t recommend it as a starting entry point until you familiarize yourself with the time period. I really suggest starting with Scholagladitoria’s videos and working your way down. When you’re ready to start going in depth, here’s where you can go to read translations of instruction manuals written by the historical Masters.

-Michi

Sep 5, 2014 1162 Buckets

julystorms:

gentlemancrow:

tmirai:

Foam and Worbla armour MEGA TUTORIAL

Tutorial by AmenoKitarou

Super duper awesome and helpful! I am totally going to try this out for my Garrosh cosplay.

YEAH GONNA NEED THIS FOR SYLVANAS HELLA

holy shit

Sep 1, 2014 66228 Buckets

atokniiro:

Success, a short comic about following your dreams

(made in celebration of my Facebook page reaching 100K Likes)

(via tarahm)

Source: atokniiro
Aug 29, 2014 48239 Buckets
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

summoner-rena:

IF YOU ARE STREAMING, DON’T USE PROCASTER.

DON’T. USE. PROCASTER.

Livestream procaster consumes large amounts of cpu for nothing. No joke, nothing. As a result your stream can become laggy and sometimes it can damage your hardware as your PC has to push itself to keep what your streaming functioning as well as possible.

"But if we can’t use procaster what can we use insteaaaaad?"

Simple. There’s two programs, both that are free, that you can use that uses very little CPU and has more options than procaster. These programs are called Xsplit and OBS. To keep your head in one piece, I’m going to go over how to stream on Livestream with Xsplit.

Under the cut of course.

Read More

(via capsaicinoid)

Aug 20, 2014 21589 Buckets

tomscholes:

These will come in handy, thanks Daniel !
He’s got another sheet on his tumblr you might also want :)

(via artanecdotally)

Source: noniol
Aug 11, 2014 4306 Buckets