thankyoucorndog:

a really dumb straight-to-ink comic about how one really loud negative presence shouldn’t overpower all the positive presences in your life or something??? idk this is bad
Hi Res

thankyoucorndog:

a really dumb straight-to-ink comic about how one really loud negative presence shouldn’t overpower all the positive presences in your life or something??? idk this is bad

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Apr 22, 2014 63236 Buckets
eyecaging:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding RulesHere’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!-Norm


Thanks my awesome animooter frand Ju Li Khaw who is Supreme Emperor of Motion. Hi Res

eyecaging:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding Rules

Here’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!

-Norm

Thanks my awesome animooter frand Ju Li Khaw who is Supreme Emperor of Motion.

(via capsaicinoid)

Source: grizandnorm
Apr 21, 2014 9830 Buckets

ivanebeoulve:

adventuresintimeandspace:

Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

yeah, for writting..

(via feeniekin)

Apr 21, 2014 106237 Buckets
10 typical perspective errors

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

(via capsaicinoid)

Apr 17, 2014 12686 Buckets
fuckingphotoshop:

addictedtophotoshop:

so i decided to compile as many useful links to various tutorials as i could - not a terribly difficult job, cause i have months’ worth of bookmarks and links scattered in semi-organized word documents stored in this laptop. if this masterpost has been of any use to you at all i’d appreciate if you could like or reblog it!! and maybe check out my theme and photoshop blog? (n˘v˘•)¬  
* all but one of these were NOT made by me!! if you would like one of your tutorials taken down just message me here and it’ll be done.

Read More
Hi Res

fuckingphotoshop:

addictedtophotoshop:

so i decided to compile as many useful links to various tutorials as i could - not a terribly difficult job, cause i have months’ worth of bookmarks and links scattered in semi-organized word documents stored in this laptop. if this masterpost has been of any use to you at all i’d appreciate if you could like or reblog it!! and maybe check out my theme and photoshop blog? (n˘v˘•)¬  

* all but one of these were NOT made by me!! if you would like one of your tutorials taken down just message me here and it’ll be done.

Read More

(via strbrryseason)

Apr 15, 2014 1637 Buckets

h-a-r-p-o:

Dan Fessler’s HD Index Painting Technique let’s you paint pixel art in Photoshop in a non-destructive manner, and lets you use pretty much every tool in a perfectly pixel-gradient fashion!

The article gives you everything you need to try it out for yourself.It’s easy to set up and use, and the results are so fucking cool.

(via red-dii)

Source: h-a-r-p-o
Apr 14, 2014 36414 Buckets

nyehcromancer:

arinnhanson:

samswritingtips:

A breakdown of medieval armor, since a lot of pieces are required to create a full suit.

ref

Ref

(via tmilosav)

Apr 10, 2014 78774 Buckets
reishizuya:

HEY GUYS THIS IS A REALLY IMPORTANT ART REF 
Hi Res

reishizuya:

HEY GUYS THIS IS A REALLY IMPORTANT ART REF

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Source: reishizuya
Apr 9, 2014 24963 Buckets

designserge asked: Who are you? And why is your blog so awesome? I was really inspired to get my act together and work harder to become a concept artist. I am seeking a place where I can become a part of a community and make friends online but I'm a bit overwhelmed by online forums. Do you have any advice? Also what is your solution for balancing practice and work? Thank you very much. Serge

artanecdotally:

eyecaging:

Oh I’m just someone who really likes art a lot and thinks it’s rad as all get out.Ahh thank you thank you. And hmm here’s the forums I post at all of them I have ran into some really nice people:

Apedogs
CFSL
CGHub
Crimson Daggers
Concept Art
Game Artisans
PArcade Artist’s Corner

But it seems Facebook is a great way to talk to other concept artists. There is:

Spitpainting: Choose a topic- Timeline is 30 minutes.

Super Speedpainting Funtimes: Choose a topic-Use whatever tools you like 50 mins.

Crit Bar! Serving up critiques

Google Hang Out Hub

LevelUp! They have a 2 hour livestream on Sunday with all sorts of amazing guest artists.

Also just hang around livestreams as well, personally I enjoy working alongside others.

http://livestreamstatuslist.appspot.com/

Keep in mind most artists are working artists and it’s hard to keep heavy contact with other folks. Me for example, I’m always working. It’s hard enough for me to spend time with people in the flesh to draw along side them. The best thing I can do is just invite people over and have a sort of “work party” of us just getting our work done and someone opts to fix food. Just enjoy the magical times you get to talk to others and always wish the best for them.

Balancing work and practice is tough. I’m a freelance so my work ebbs and flows. Right now I’m juggling 4 freelance jobs so my schedule is really tight. No real time for practice but I can watch lectures on the side. But when I do have free time I make sure to practice where I can. It’s fun and just a good way to experiment with either workflow, style, or something you been hankering on messing with. Work is work, but with practice try and make it fun. Also don’t get discouraged when the painting doesn’t go your way. That’s great! It means you still have a lot to learn and the weakness is obvious and now you have goals. The worst feeling is you want to improve but you don’t know how so your kind of floundering about.

Also the most important thing I stress to EVERYONE. Is if you want people to know you. Post your work. Post it everywhere. Post it on CGHub, make a separate Facebook name to post your work under, if you want to separate your career from your personal life. Make an instagram account, push yourself to do traditional doodles when you have time. Make a tumblr: post on it.  Twitter has a lot of art collabs on it. I’m in the League of Legends, One Piece, DragonBall, and Kill La Kill collab. Instagram links up to twitter and tumblr. Do not be shy. Though don’t be imposing and aggressive and ask people to look at your work. If people ask, link your work. If not, no sweat just enjoy the conversation your having with the person. This may sound silly but you have no idea how much artists get spammed on facebook ” HEY CAN YOU LIKE MY PAGE??” and they have had no prior conversation with them. Don’t do that. Don’t feel entitled to an another persons time, especially if they are a stranger. It’s weird how people think this way. That people are automatically friends because they both do the same thing. That is really silly. Just let friendships happen casually.

Crits is a weird area where you again you don’t want to be imposing or really aggressive but you do want to ask for them. Asking openly when you post a piece is probably the best way to go. Honestly, feel it out! I know my friends are always super busy but when I ask it’s something along the lines of ” Hey man, do you have time to give me a crit?” Just keep it casual. 

I strong armed my shy wife into posting his work more and he thanks me for it everyday. He’s gotten better and his workflow much more frequent then before. For some reason, posting your work more publically and around other artists you feel this pressure to work harder and more frequently. Because everyone else is.

Sorry if this is long and rambly. I hope this helps!

PA:AC REPRESENT

Source: eyecaging
Apr 2, 2014 192 Buckets

shuraiya:

anatomicalart:

gorankun:

Wrist, Hand & Finger Stretching Routine. For those tired artsy hands! When it already hurts to draw (or write), we should stop for a moment and then stretch + rest our hands.

I’m gonna take a break and do this for a moment.

Very good for artists to do regularly. Doing these exercises regularly helps prevent long term issues like arthritis and carpal tunnel.

Also good for anybody who sews, crochets, knits, etc! 

(via sushsush)

Source: gorankun
Apr 1, 2014 10942 Buckets
okolnir:

How to sketch up a city quickly ^^ CLICK HERE FOR FULL SIZE. This is a rough re-creation of this sketch since there was interest in how I did it without pulling my hair off, and I wanted to share it in case people just need to get a rough cityscape in photoshop quick without the hassle and without the help of other programs like google sketchup.
Obviously this looks very rough it was meant to be and also because I made it in a real hurry, so please excuse some of the ridiculous looking buildings and other illogical appearances. to create more precise cityscapes using this method, simply stop using the brush tool and use line tool/polygonal lasso tool—even using the brush tool and holding down shift is fine—instead to create precise, straight lines. The slower you do this process the more accurate your final piece will be, however the premise of this method is that if you want/need to do it fast, you can.
good luck :D Hi Res

okolnir:

How to sketch up a city quickly ^^ CLICK HERE FOR FULL SIZE. This is a rough re-creation of this sketch since there was interest in how I did it without pulling my hair off, and I wanted to share it in case people just need to get a rough cityscape in photoshop quick without the hassle and without the help of other programs like google sketchup.

Obviously this looks very rough it was meant to be and also because I made it in a real hurry, so please excuse some of the ridiculous looking buildings and other illogical appearances. to create more precise cityscapes using this method, simply stop using the brush tool and use line tool/polygonal lasso tool—even using the brush tool and holding down shift is fine—instead to create precise, straight lines. The slower you do this process the more accurate your final piece will be, however the premise of this method is that if you want/need to do it fast, you can.

good luck :D

(via capsaicinoid)

Source: okolnir
Mar 27, 2014 7575 Buckets
How to Improve Flat Characters

fictionwritingtips:

If you’re having trouble making your characters interesting or you feel like all your characters turn out the same, you’re probably creating flat characters. If your character hasn’t undergone a significant change during the course of your novel or your audience is having trouble relating to them, you need find ways to improve this. It’s important to remember that all your characters need to have goals, no matter how small, and they need to be actively working toward those goals to stay interesting.

Your protagonist should be relatable and realistic. Even if your readers don’t necessarily agree with what they’re doing, they should be able to feel what your protagonist is going through. This is your job as a writer. You need to get your readers to understand their thought process or what they’re going through, even if they’ve never experienced it themselves. This can be achieved by using real-life emotions in your story, so it’s important you don’t ignore the emotional aspects of storytelling. Most people will understand love, fear, sadness, happiness—EVEN if they’ve never been in the situation your protagonist is in.

One of the most important things to remember is that your character’s actions should remain realistic. And I don’t mean that they need to do things only we can do in our world, but their actions need to stay true to their world. Their actions should make sense in context to what they’re going through.

Your protagonist should also be a problem solver and proactive. A character with good morals will have integrity, but we all know not all main character have good intentions. However, all protagonists should be able to do things on their own, or else they’re going to be a weak protagonist. I’m not saying they don’t need help, but they need to overcome the big challenges on their own. They can’t just stand around waiting for everyone else to finish things. They need to take initiative at some point, and this should be due to their personal growth throughout the story.

Here are some tips on improving flat characters:

Focus on primary traits, complexity traits, and character flaws.

Primary traits: Every character you write should have primary traits. These are things like smart, funny, inquisitive, etc. These aren’t necessarily anything deep, but they give the reader enough to understand what sort of category or archetype that character fits in.

Complexity traits: Adding complexity traits will be what adds more depth to your characters, and will make your characters interesting. This is necessary if you are building lead characters/main characters. With complexity traits, you plan out the primary traits with more detail. For example, if your character is smart explain what he or she is smart in. Does he or she know a lot about history? Are they good at math?

Character Flaws: Finally, give that character flaws. These flaws humanize your characters and they generally stand in the way of your character’s success.  It’s important that your characters fail sometimes and that these failures are a result of their personal flaws. No one wants to see a perfect character. We want to see someone who is able to pull themselves back together after experiencing failure. We want to see them earn their success.

Next, focus on character goals and motivations.

Character goals: Every single character your write needs to want something. They need to have a goal and those goals will drive your story forward. For example, your main character might want to run a marathon. It’s a big deal for them and they spend your entire novel training (and failing at training) until the end when they finally do it. Running that marathon is their goal throughout your novel and they won’t stop until they succeed. Remember, character goals are different from motivations.

Also, keep in mind that even secondary characters need to want something. Develop each character and make sure you understand why they want to do something. What do they get from helping out your main character? Why do they care so much? Think about what’s at stake for them.

Motivations: There are certain things that will push your characters forward. Expanding on the marathon scenario above, maybe your main character has to finish a marathon because they will win 1 million dollars if they do. Maybe their family is poor and this is the only way to help them. That’s your character motivation. It’s obvious they really care about their family and they need the money. It’s important to understand why your character is doing something and why they want something. What will accomplishing their goals do for them? Why do they need to do? Again, what’s at stake if they don’t?

Character development is a long, in-depth process, but hopefully following these steps will help you out. It’s important that you keep your characters proactive or else you run the risk of them becoming boring. Characters that work actively toward their goals are the most interesting.

-Kris Noel

(via capsaicinoid)

Mar 25, 2014 3654 Buckets

madoka07:

[blog] 2014 Exhibition location Osaka Sumo

http://madoka07.blogspot.jp/2014/03/2014-exhibition-location-osaka-sumo.html

WHOA that paint splattery thing is cool, I gotta buy/make me one of those…

(via theleftnippleofgilgamesh)

Source: madoka07
Mar 25, 2014 25125 Buckets